According to a new study, early people traveled into subarctic areas earlier than previously assumed.

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According to a new study, early people traveled into subarctic areas earlier than previously assumed.

For thousands of years, humans have lived on all but one of Earth’s continents, yet how Homo sapiens effectively distributed around the globe remains a mystery.

Most theories assume that early people relied on warmer climatic conditions to migrate north, but a new study of archaeological artifacts suggests that humans were weathering freezing circumstances considerably earlier than previously thought, similar to those found in modern-day northern Scandinavia.

Early human societies were unexpectedly flexible and resilient, according to new study published in the journal Science Advances on Wednesday.

In a press release, study co-author Jean-Jacques Hublin, director of the Max Planck Institute’s Department of Human Evolution, said, “Using these new insights, new models of our species’ spread across Eurasia will now need to be constructed, taking into account their higher degree of climatic flexibility.”

Scientists concentrated their research on human settlement inside Bacho Kiro Cave, a significant archaeological site in Bulgaria.

Researchers examined thousands of years of archaeological materials, including the remains of herbivores killed by human dwellers.

Scientists recovered paleoclimate data from these materials, allowing researchers to create a thorough record of what local climate conditions were like during the time when humans occupied the cave.

According to research co-author Kate Britton, the technique provides a greater understanding of the context of local climates, as compared to more common correlations drawn between archaeological evidence and climatic archives from diverse regions.

Britton, who is also a researcher at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology and the University of Aberdeen, said, “It really provides us insight into what life was like “on the ground.”

Few archaeological sites can provide both evidence of human residence and good paleoclimate data, making research like that done since Bacho Kiro Cave difficult.

“Oxygen isotope studies or other ways of generating climatic data directly from archaeological sites remain scarce for the time period when Homo sapiens first spread across Eurasia,” said lead study author Sarah Pederzani, who is also a researcher at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology and the University of Aberdeen.

Pederzani drilled on the teeth of ancient animals found in the cave for a year. Researchers used stable isotope ratio mass spectrometry to… Article Summary from Nokia News

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