According to a study, LGBTQ youth are more prone to consider suicide at an earlier age.

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According to a study, LGBTQ youth are more prone to consider suicide at an earlier age.

According to a new US government study, children who are gay, bisexual, or questioning their sexuality are more likely to consider suicide at a young age.

Teenagers who are members of sexual minorities have a higher risk of suicide thoughts and acts than their heterosexual counterparts, which has long been known.

This covers children who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, or questioning lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, or questioning lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, or

According to experts, the new findings, which were published online this week in the journal Pediatrics, add another layer: those children begin to struggle with suicidal thoughts at an earlier age, with an increased risk surfacing as early as age 10.

Furthermore, they tended to move faster from the stage of “considering” suicide to actually planning it.

None of this implies that LGBTQ children are doomed to suffer from mental illness, according to Brian Mustanski, director of Northwestern University’s Institute for Sexual and Gender Minority Health and Wellbeing.

“They are at a higher risk of suicide than the general population, but the majority of LGBTQ youth fare well,” said Mustanski, who was not involved in the research.

According to Mustanski, it’s critical to detect the elevated danger and that it starts early.

He claims that at the age of puberty, children become aware of their sexual attraction. Those blossoming sensations may be accompanied by anguish for kids attracted to their own sex, or both, if they have been exposed to “anti-gay” messaging during childhood, Mustanski added.

As a result, it’s critical that youngsters realize that those inclinations are normal from an early age, he said.

“For LGBQ children, coming out is a difficult process,” said Jeremy Luk, the study’s principal researcher.

The “good news,” he noted, is that LGBTQ teens who report high levels of acceptance from either their parents or classmates had a lower likelihood of trying suicide, according to prior study.

“In other words, acceptance goes a long way,” said Luk, a clinical psychologist at the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development at the time of the study’s inception.

The findings are based on 1,771 high school students in the United States who participated in a broader study that tracked their health and well-being.

Around 6% stated they were attracted to their own sex, both sexes, or were “concerned.” Gender identification was not a question in the poll.

In total, 26% of sexual minority adolescent… Article Summary from Nokia News

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