Although La Nina is projected to be weaker this winter, portions of the United States are expected to see Arctic temperatures.

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Although La Nina is projected to be weaker this winter, portions of the United States are expected to see Arctic temperatures.

Oct. 4 — The days are becoming shorter and the temperatures are dropping, indicating that winter is just around the corner. Others may be wondering what the coldest time of the year has in store while some celebrate the return of snow.

Last winter will be remembered for a long time, notably in the central United States, when a snowstorm followed by bitter cold left millions of people in the dark across Texas. Only a few days later, 73 percent of the country had snow on the ground, the greatest percentage since the metric was first recorded in 2003. In addition, Denver saw the snowiest winter in 37 years.

AccuWeather’s team of long-range forecasters, lead by Senior Meteorologist Paul Pastelok, has released its annual winter forecast, allowing consumers throughout the country time to prepare for what is predicted to be a busy winter season from coast to coast. Due to a meteorological phenomena known as La Nia, AccuWeather predicts some similarities between this winter and last winter.

Last winter, La Nia was a major factor in determining weather patterns across the country for the whole season. When the water around the equator of the Pacific Ocean is cooler than usual, it is known as La Nia. As a result, the jet stream and the path that storms take as they move over North America are affected. It is also the polar opposite of the well-known El Nio.

This winter, La Nia is expected to form part of the overall weather patterns once again, although Pastelok believes it will be weaker than the one that occurred last year. This “paves the way” for other factors to enter the winter prediction, particularly in the second half of the season.

There are also indicators that, unlike last year, the polar vortex may be weaker this winter. This might allow colder air from the Arctic to enter the United States before the formal start of meteorological winter on December 1. The first official day of winter, astronomical winter, falls on December 21.

Northeast

Residents in the northeastern United States may want to get out their winter coats sooner rather than later, as winter weather may arrive early this year.

“This coming winter,… Article Summary from Nokia News

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